Anamorphine Is A VR Adventure Tackling Mental Illness For Rift, Vive, PSVR

Anamorphine Is A VR Adventure Tackling Mental Illness For Rift, Vive, PSVR

It’s been an interesting year for games and mental illness. Releases like Hellblade show that developers aren’t afraid to tackle this difficult subject and find something unique to say about it. Artifact 5 is looking to do the same with the help of VR in Anamorphine.
The experience follows Tyler, a man struggling with post-traumatic denial following a tragic accident that leaves his wife Elena unable to play the cello.
The piece will see you revisiting moments in the pair’s relationship to tackle tough complications in Tyler’s psyche. There’s no dialogue or action; everything is told through a tour of the protagonist’s dreams. Check out the story teaser below.
We’ll be interested to see what VR adds to this project. The ability to climb inside someone else’s traumatic memories and decode their thoughts and emotions should be quite powerful.

County officials: Mental illness is a huge drain on resources for central Ohio jails

County officials: Mental illness is a huge drain on resources for central Ohio jails

Please install the latest Adobe Flash Player Plugin to watch this content.
The toll this takes on families and the costs to taxpayers are staggering.
But a national Initiative called Stepping Up Ohio is working with counties to assess those with serious mental illness and treat them or refer them to the appropriate facility.
Delaware County Jail is one of a couple in Central Ohio that screen people arrested to divert those with severe mental illnesses to treatment facilities instead of a jail cell.
Delaware and Franklin County officials said they have incorporated the Stepping Up Initiative Ohio to avoid those type of mental health horror stories. Volpe spoke before hundreds of Ohio county employees and his experience and the initiative.
“When people who are mentally ill get in jail they get worse, and I have sheriff after sheriff say they take 90 percent of their jail resources,” said Stratton.
“Since then, that was 10 years ago, I have not gotten into trouble, I have played an active role in the community and I am now a current employee of the Dade County Court,” he said.
Franklin County jails have also been assessing and treating individuals where officials say 37 percent of all inmates in their jail have mental illness.
The Franklin County Sheriff’s Office has also been in the forefront in training Crisis Intervention Training CIT, for deputies and correction officers.

Highland Rivers Health: It’s past time to erase the stigma of mental illness

Highland Rivers Health: It’s past time to erase the stigma of mental illness

While both invisible and silent would seem to imply stealthy, secretive diseases, hypertension is referred to as a silent disease because individuals affected by it often have no symptoms. Even so, when an individual learns he or she has high blood pressure, there is little shame in acknowledging it — even if that individual’s lifestyle choices may have contributed to it.
And it may only be “invisible” to the extent an individual does not recognize his or her unusual thoughts, feelings or emotions are symptoms of mental illness — and many don’t.
But a more profound reason mental illness might remain invisible is stigma. The fact is, not all that long ago we as a society tried very hard to make mental illness invisible.
If you know someone with diabetes — which affects just under one in 10 people — you are twice as likely to know someone with mental illness.
If it seems such a large number couldn’t possibly be accurate, or that mental illness would be much more visible if it affected 20 percent of the population, there’s a very good reason for that: people with mental illness can recover.
With the right services and supports, individuals with temporary or chronic mental health conditions can recover, learn to manage their symptoms and enjoy productive, independent lives in their community.
Individuals simply can’t work toward recovery if they or their family members are ashamed to acknowledge mental illness and seek treatment.
Because acknowledging that mental illness is not uncommon, that almost everyone is impacted by it in one way or another, and that people can recover, is the most important way we can help put individuals with mental illness on the path to recovery.

Lena Dunham Says Chronic and Mental Illness Made Her Adopt a New Attitude

Lena Dunham Says Chronic and Mental Illness Made Her Adopt a New Attitude

On Monday, Lena Dunham tweeted she has a “new attitude” about living with chronic illness, depression and anxiety.
Practicing gratitude for all it’s embarrassing but feels great.
As part of these conversations, she’s advocated for erasing the stigma and shame surrounding mental health issues and has encouraged others who are struggling to seek help.
To learn more about how to practice self-care when you have a chronic illness, check out these tips and advice. If you’re having a tough day, here are some ideas for self-care.

Walk Towards Recovery in Torrington aims to dispel stigma around mental illness

Walk Towards Recovery in Torrington aims to dispel stigma around mental illness

TORRINGTON – The group came into the center of town, carrying messages of hope and support.
Community members showed off signs to the public as they walked through the downtown, ending up at City Hall.
“I want to have people understand what we’re going through,” said Howe.
Willow Dealy of Torrington said she wanted people to take away that the community cared about mental health – in addition to service providers, the Torrington police and fire departments participated in the walk – and advocate for continued state support for mental health services.
Torrington resident Russell Classey talked of his battle with mental illness and suicidal thoughts and urged people to be kind to others.
“We are people too, people with interests, hobbies, loved ones, and stories to tell and we are doing our best to be strong and upright,” said Classey.
Recovery is a journey, not something that happens all at once, he said. The lived experience he earned prompted the chance to work for the state, and now, he’s reached his current position.
Carbone said the annual event had grown markedly in the four years she had been in office, and the support the group showed for one another was remarkable.