Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her son thank supporters after her cancer diagnosis

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her son thank supporters after her cancer diagnosis

Julia Louis-Dreyfus and her family shared sentimental appreciation for the outpouring of public support — and for each other — after the “Veep” star revealed her breast cancer diagnosis this past week.
I couldn’t be more thankful for the outpouring of support for my mom yesterday. Here’s a picture of us taken last year.
“Here’s a picture of us taken last year.
I’m thankful, too.
The Northwestern men’s basketball team tweeted at their teammate’s mom: “You’ve been there for us.

Breast Cancer Death Rates Decline, As Major Cancer Risk Factor Rises

Breast Cancer Death Rates Decline, As Major Cancer Risk Factor Rises

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Wednesday it was announced that breast cancer death rates are going down.
But as CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reports, the good news comes with a warning: A major cancer risk factor is on the rise.
Even so, breast cancer death rates are declining.
She found a lump in her breast while she was breast feeding her daughter. A mammogram confirmed her worst fear – breast cancer.
That was nine years ago, making Fuentes one of a growing number of breast cancer survivors.
In fact, a new study finds that over the past 25 years, breast cancer death rates have dropped by nearly 40 percent.
“Your chances of being alive after a diagnosis of breast cancer are significantly higher than if you got diagnosed in 1982,” said Dr. Roshni Rao, the chief of breast surgery at New York Presbyterian/Columbia.
“There’s no doubt that mammography saves lives,” she said.
But Fuentes likes to focus on the good news, as a cancer survivor.

How is breast cancer related to the axillary lymph nodes?

How is breast cancer related to the axillary lymph nodes?

A breast cancer prognosis is better when the cancer is only in the breast, and the lymph nodes are not affected.
Also, if the cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, a doctor will usually recommend removing the lymph nodes during the surgery to remove the originating tumor.
Lymph nodes are responsible for draining lymph fluid, so their removal can cause some side effects after surgery.
A doctor will then test these for cancer to determine if it has spread beyond the sentinel lymph node and, if so, how far it has spread.
N0: Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes.
A doctor will also consider the overall size of a person’s tumor, the type of cells present, and if the cancer has spread to other organs.

Local foundation aims to ease burden of cancer

Local foundation aims to ease burden of cancer

I’ve had surgeries, plastic surgeries, all that,” said Nora Souhrada, 45, who is currently on her third round of cancer.
Every bit helps.
“We were struggling financially, and I heard about the Citrus Aid Cancer Foundation from Patti (Wood), that they help people with cancer. But I’m like most people, I don’t want to ask for help,” Souhrada said.
He, Wood, and two others — Tobey Phillips and Mary Pericht — got together to discuss ways to help local people with cancer with their financial needs as they go through treatment.
At that time, the American Cancer Society had shifted its focus nationally to advocacy and treatment.
Also, the foundation itself has an annual “Swing For A Cure” fundraising golf tournament.
This year’s tournament is Friday, Oct. 20, at Skyview at Terra Vista in Citrus Hills.

This Awesome Blood Labyrinth Is The Newest Method For Catching Cancer Cells

This Awesome Blood Labyrinth Is The Newest Method For Catching Cancer Cells

A new chip with a labyrinth design promises big improvements in detecting rare and aggressive cancer cells in the blood, helping doctors to anticipate tumour growth and plan customised treatments for their patients.
By controlling the flow of the blood through this micro-maze, the chip is able to separate out larger types of cells, including cancer cells and cancer stem cells known to be particularly malignant and resistant to drugs.
Such cancer cells can be one in a billion in a flow of normal white blood cells, and the new method is more effective and faster than current techniques at finding its targets, according to the team from the University of Michigan. “The markers for them are so complex, there is no one marker we could target for all these stages.”
The cells are also thought to sometimes transform into cancer stem cells (CSCs), types of cells that can grow and feed new tumours, which is another reason scientists are keen to keep a close eye on them.
Also crucial are the many corners the researchers have built into their maze: It creates a flow that puts the smaller white blood cells in the perfect position to get snagged.
What’s left at the other end is a much cleaner stream of cancer cells that scientists can then use for their analysis.
The new process is fast too, and by adding a second chip, the team was able to reduce the number of white blood cells in a sample by 10 in just five minutes.
In this case, once the cancer cells are caught and filtered out, scientists can study them to find ones on their way to and from stem-like states.
The new technique is also being used in a breast cancer clinical trial, investigating the effectiveness of a treatment that blocks an immune-signalling molecule called interleukin 6 – experts think interleukin 6 enables cancer stem cells, and this labyrinth-on-a-chip should help to prove it.